Why buy when you can rent

Testimonials

“My aunt loves her apartment, which is really bright and sunny. The quality of life here is tremendous. She has made a number of friends and very much enjoys the social aspect. It is perfect for her.”

Niece of a Clevedon Resident

 


Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional| Valid CSS!
  • Retire with style at The Hawthorns
  • Retire with style at The Hawthorns
  • Retire with style at The Hawthorns
  • Retire with style at The Hawthorns

Historic Plaques Come Home to The Hawthorns Eastbourne

The plaques, dating back to 1832 and 1888, commemorate the founding and later expansion of the Victorian Hospital which once stood at the Carew Road site now occupied by The Hawthorns retirement village. The Princess Alice Memorial Hospital, Eastbourne. The plaques were transported and and winched into place by Hobbs Recovery Services.  They are now on display in a flower garden at the entrance to The Hawthorns.

Historic plaques from the Princess Alice Memorial Hospital have been returned to their original home at The Hawthorns Eastbourne.

The plaques, dating back to 1832 and 1888, commemorate the founding and later expansion of the Victorian hospital which once stood at the Carew Road site now occupied by The Hawthorns retirement village.

Town residents discovered the plaques in a derelict state in the grounds of Eastbourne District General and launched a campaign to have them returned to the old hospital site. After much campaigning and an appeal from local historians, the plaques were returned to the Carew Road site by volunteers from Hobbs Recovery Services, and placed in a flower garden at the entrance to The Hawthorns.

The original hospital was built in memory of Princess Alice, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. Princess Alice was a prolific patron of women's causes and showed an interest in nursing, especially the work of Florence Nightingale, and devoted much of her time to the management of field hospitals in the Austro-Prussian war.

The Princess spent some of her last months in Eastbourne and was held in great affection by the people of the town. When Alice succumbed to diphtheria at the young age of 35 it was decided that a cottage hospital would be built in the town to commemorate her good deeds.

Co-manager of The Hawthorns Justin Bennett said the retirement village was thrilled to see the return of the memorial plaques. "We treasure our relationship with the local community, so this historical connection between The Hawthorns and the town of Eastbourne and its residents is something to cherish," said Mr Bennett.

"We will be hosting a big party later this year to officially welcome home this royal link between our wonderful residency and a princess devoted to the care of others.".

If you would like more informaion about the plaques or would like to come and see them for yourself, call us on 01323 640088 to arrange a visit.